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Grade: A

Resolving merge conflicts in Git is a common task that developers encounter when working on collaborative projects. A merge conflict occurs when two or more branches have made changes to the same lines of code, and Git is unable to automatically merge them. Here's a step-by-step guide on how to resolve merge conflicts:

  1. Identify the merge conflict: When you try to merge two branches, Git will notify you if there are any conflicts. The conflicting files will be marked with conflict markers (<<<<<<<, =======, and >>>>>>>).

  2. Open the conflicting file(s): Use your text editor or IDE to open the file(s) containing the merge conflicts.

  3. Analyze the conflicts: Look for the conflict markers in the file(s). The lines between <<<<<<< and ======= are the changes from your current branch, and the lines between ======= and >>>>>>> are the changes from the branch you're merging.

  4. Resolve the conflicts: Decide which changes you want to keep. You can choose to keep your changes, the changes from the other branch, or a combination of both. Remove the conflict markers and edit the file(s) accordingly.

  5. Stage the resolved file(s): After resolving the conflicts in the file(s), stage the changes using the git add command:

    git add <file1> <file2> ...
    
  6. Commit the merge: Once you've staged all the resolved files, commit the merge with a descriptive commit message:

    git commit -m "Resolved merge conflicts"
    
  7. Push the changes: If you're working on a remote repository, push the resolved merge to the remote branch:

    git push
    

Here's an example of what a merge conflict might look like in a file:

<<<<<<< HEAD
// This is the code from your current branch
console.log("Hello, World!");
=======
// This is the code from the branch you're merging
console.log("Hello, Git!");
>>>>>>> branch-to-merge

To resolve this conflict, you might choose to keep the code from your current branch:

console.log("Hello, World!");

Or, you might decide to keep the code from the branch you're merging:

console.log("Hello, Git!");

Alternatively, you could combine both changes:

console.log("Hello, World!");
console.log("Hello, Git!");

It's important to carefully review each conflict and make sure that the resolved code is correct and consistent with the intended functionality.

If you're using a graphical Git client or an IDE with built-in Git support, it may provide a more user-friendly interface for resolving merge conflicts. However, understanding the underlying concepts and commands is still valuable, especially when working with complex merge scenarios or resolving conflicts from the command line.

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Grade: A

To resolve merge conflicts in a Git repository, follow these steps:

  1. Identify Conflicts:

    • Open your terminal and navigate to your Git repository.
    • Run git status to see which files have conflicts.
  2. Edit Conflicted Files:

    • Open each conflicted file in a text editor or an IDE.
    • Look for the conflict markers (<<<<<<<, =======, >>>>>>>).
    • Decide what to keep, edit the file to resolve the conflicts. This might involve combining content from both conflicting sections, or choosing one over the other.
  3. Mark as Resolved:

    • After editing, save your file.
    • Run git add <file> to mark the conflict as resolved.
  4. Finalize the Merge:

    • Once all conflicts are resolved and the files are added, complete the merge by running git commit.
    • Git will open a text editor to allow you to edit the commit message for the merge.
  5. Verify the Merge:

    • Use git log to ensure the merge commit is in the history.
    • Run git status again to make sure there are no more conflicts and the working directory is clean.
  6. Push Changes (if needed):

    • If you are working in a shared repository, push your changes to the remote repository using git push.

By following these steps, you can successfully resolve merge conflicts in your Git repository.

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Grade: A

To resolve merge conflicts in Git, you can follow these steps:

  1. Identify the conflicted files: After attempting a merge in Git, if there are any conflicts, Git will notify you of the affected files. You can check the status using git status. Conflicts are typically indicated by an A or M symbol followed by a <<<, >>>>, and |||| marker in the file names.

  2. Open the conflicted files: Use a text editor or an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) to open the files that Git has identified as having conflicts.

  3. Resolve the conflicts visually: In each conflicted file, look for sections marked with <<<, >>>>, and ||||. These markers represent the differences between your current branch and the one you're merging from. You need to manually edit the content to reconcile these changes.

    • The text between the <<< and >>> markers represents the changes made in your current branch, while the text between |||| markers represents changes from the branch you're merging.
    • Compare the two sections and decide which one should remain in the final merge result. You may choose to keep the content from one section and remove or modify the conflicting parts from the other section. Ensure that your resolved file is consistent and makes logical sense after resolving a conflict.
  4. Save and stage changes: Once you've resolved conflicts in a file, save the changes and use git add to stage the file for committing. If the merge still shows unresolved conflicts, Git will notify you that certain files are not fully staged. In such cases, you might need to resolve any remaining conflicts and stage them separately before proceeding with the commit.

  5. Commit: After all conflicts have been resolved, you can use git commit to finalize the merge process and create a new commit that includes the changes from both branches. Be sure to write an informative commit message describing the merges made.

  6. Push the changes: Finally, if your repository is configured for remote repositories like GitHub or GitLab, you should use git push to publish your updated code to the remote branch. This will make the changes available to other collaborators on the project.

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Grade: A

Merge conflicts in Git occur when you and another contributor have made changes to the same lines in a file, and Git can't automatically merge those changes. To resolve merge conflicts, follow these steps:

  1. Check the status of your Git repository: Use the command git status to see which files have conflicts.

    $ git status
    On branch main
    You have unmerged paths.
    (fix conflicts and then commit)
    
    Unmerged paths:
      (use "git add <file>..." to mark resolution)
    
            both modified:   path/to/conflicted_file
    no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")
    
  2. Open the conflicted file(s): The conflicted file(s) will have markers indicating the conflicting sections. They look like this:

    <<<<<<< HEAD
    Conflicting line in your current branch.
    ========
    Conflicting line in the branch you're merging.
    >>>>>>> branch-name
    
  3. Resolve the conflicts: Edit the file and decide which changes to keep, and delete the conflict markers (<<<<<<<, =======, and >>>>>>>). Save the file when you're done.

    Line that should be in the final version.
    
  4. Add the resolved file(s) to the staging area: Use the command git add <file> for each resolved file.

    $ git add path/to/conflicted_file
    
  5. Commit the resolved merge: Use the command git commit -m "Resolved merge conflict" to complete the merge.

    $ git commit -m "Resolved merge conflict"
    
  6. Push your changes: Finally, push your changes to the remote repository using git push.

    $ git push
    

Remember, the key to resolving merge conflicts is carefully reviewing the conflicting changes and deciding which parts to keep based on your project's requirements.

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Grade: A
  1. Identify the conflicted files by running git status.
  2. Open each conflicted file and look for conflict markers (e.g., "<<<<<<<", "=======", ">>>>>>>").
  3. Decide on the changes you want to keep from both branches.
  4. Resolve conflicts in each file by editing them directly:
    • Remove the conflict markers.
    • Keep only the desired code sections and remove any redundant or conflicting parts.
  5. After resolving all conflicts, stage the files using git add <file>.
  6. Commit the resolved changes with a descriptive message (e.g., "Resolved merge conflicts").
  7. Push your commits to the remote repository if necessary: git push origin <branch-name>.

For more detailed guidance, refer to resources like Stack Overflow and GitHub documentation on resolving Git merge conflicts.

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Grade: A

Resolving merge conflicts in a Git repository is a common task that developers often encounter. Here's a step-by-step guide on how to handle merge conflicts:

  1. Identify the Merge Conflict: When you try to merge two branches and Git detects a conflict, it will mark the conflicting areas in the affected files. You'll see the conflicting sections enclosed within special markers:
<<<<<<< HEAD
# Your changes
=======
# Changes from the other branch
>>>>>>> other-branch
  1. Review the Conflicts: Examine the conflicting sections and decide which changes you want to keep. You may need to consult with the other team members who made the conflicting changes.

  2. Edit the Conflicting Files: Open the conflicting files in a text editor and manually resolve the conflicts by editing the code. Remove the conflict markers (<<<<<<, =======, >>>>>>) and keep the changes you want to preserve.

  3. Stage the Resolved Conflicts: After resolving the conflicts, add the modified files to the staging area using the git add command.

    git add <conflicting-file>
    
  4. Commit the Resolved Conflicts: Once all conflicts have been resolved and staged, create a new commit to finalize the merge.

    git commit -m "Resolve merge conflicts"
    
  5. Push the Resolved Conflicts: If you were merging a remote branch, you'll need to push your resolved conflicts to the remote repository.

    git push
    

Here's an example of how you might resolve a merge conflict:

<<<<<<< HEAD
# Your changes
print("Hello, world!")
=======
# Changes from the other branch
print("Goodbye, world!")
>>>>>>> other-branch

In this case, you would edit the file to keep the changes you want:

print("Hello, world!")

Then, you would add the file, commit the changes, and push the resolved conflict to the remote repository.

Remember, resolving merge conflicts may require collaboration with your team members, especially when the conflicting changes are complex. Take your time, carefully review the changes, and communicate with your team to ensure a successful merge.

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Grade: A

To resolve merge conflicts in a Git repository, follow these steps:

  1. Identify the conflicting files:

    • When you attempt to merge branches and encounter conflicts, Git will mark the conflicting files and halt the merge process.
    • Use the command git status to see which files have conflicts.
  2. Open the conflicting files in a text editor:

    • Open each file that has conflicts in your preferred text editor.
  3. Locate the conflict markers:

    • In the conflicting files, you will see conflict markers that indicate the conflicting changes.
    • The markers will look like this:
      <<<<<<< HEAD
      Your changes
      =======
      Changes from the other branch
      >>>>>>> branch-name
      
  4. Resolve the conflicts:

    • Manually edit the files to resolve the conflicts.
    • Remove the conflict markers (<<<<<<<, =======, >>>>>>>) and keep the desired changes.
    • Make sure the file contents are in the state you want them to be after the merge.
  5. Stage the resolved files:

    • After resolving the conflicts, stage the modified files using the git add command. For example:
      git add file1.txt file2.txt
      
  6. Commit the changes:

    • Once all the conflicting files are staged, commit the changes to complete the merge:
      git commit -m "Resolve merge conflicts"
      
  7. Push the changes (if necessary):

    • If you're working on a remote repository and want to push the merged changes, use the git push command:
      git push origin branch-name
      

Here's an example of resolving a merge conflict in a file named example.txt:

  1. Open example.txt and locate the conflict markers:

    <<<<<<< HEAD
    This is the original content.
    =======
    This is the modified content from the other branch.
    >>>>>>> branch-name
    
  2. Resolve the conflict by editing the file:

    This is the resolved content.
    
  3. Stage the resolved file:

    git add example.txt
    
  4. Commit the changes:

    git commit -m "Resolve merge conflict in example.txt"
    

Remember to communicate with your team members if you encounter conflicts in files that multiple people are working on simultaneously. It's important to discuss and agree on the desired changes before resolving the conflicts.

By following these steps, you should be able to successfully resolve merge conflicts in your Git repository.

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Grade: A

Step 1: Inspect the Merge Conflict

  • Open the files with the merge conflicts in a text editor.
  • Identify the conflicting changes between the two branches.

Step 2: Manually Resolve the Conflicts

  • Decide which changes you want to keep from each branch.
  • Edit the files to merge the changes manually.
  • Ensure that the resolved file reflects the desired outcome.

Step 3: Mark the Conflicts as Resolved

  • Once the conflicts are resolved, stage the modified files using git add.
  • This marks the conflicts as resolved and prepares them for the next commit.

Step 4: Commit the Resolved Changes

  • Commit the changes with a clear commit message indicating that the merge conflicts have been resolved.
  • Example: git commit -m "Resolved merge conflicts"

Additional Tips:

  • Use git diff to compare the conflicting files and identify the differences.
  • Use git mergetool to launch a graphical merge tool that can help resolve the conflicts.
  • Be careful not to introduce new conflicts when resolving existing ones.
  • Test the resolved changes to ensure they work as expected.

Example:

Let's say you have a merge conflict in the README.md file. Here's how you would resolve it:

# Step 1: Inspect the conflict
git diff README.md
# See the conflicting changes between the two branches

# Step 2: Resolve the conflict manually
vim README.md
# Edit the file and merge the changes

# Step 3: Mark the conflict as resolved
git add README.md

# Step 4: Commit the resolved changes
git commit -m "Resolved merge conflict in README.md"
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Grade: A

Resolving Merge Conflicts in a Git Repository

Step 1: Identify the Conflict:

  • Use the git status command to identify the affected files with merge conflicts.
  • Look for files with a conflicted status.

Step 2: Review Conflicting Versions:

  • Use the git show command to view the conflicting versions of the file.
  • Compare the two versions to identify the areas of conflict.

Step 3: Edit the Conflicted File:

  • Open the conflicted file in a text editor.
  • Resolve the conflicts manually, considering both versions and your desired changes.
  • Make sure to preserve the original content and resolve all conflicts.

Step 4: Commit and Push:

  • Once the conflicts are resolved, add the modified file to the commit using git add.
  • Commit the changes with a descriptive message.
  • Push the changes to the remote repository with git push.

Additional Tips:

  • Use a text editor that highlights conflicting lines for easier visibility.
  • If conflicts are extensive, consider creating a local branch to isolate and resolve them separately.
  • Use a diff tool to visually compare the conflicting versions.
  • Refer to the official Git documentation for detailed conflict resolution guidelines.

Example:

# Identify conflicted files
git status

# Review conflicting versions
git show <file_name>

# Edit the conflicted file
nano <file_name>

# Resolve conflicts and make changes
...

# Commit and push changes
git add <file_name>
git commit -m "Resolved merge conflicts"
git push

Common Causes of Merge Conflicts:

  • Different deletion patterns
  • Modified lines in different versions
  • Conflicting formatting or indentation
  • Renamed files or directories

Note:

  • Merge conflicts can occur when two or more developers contribute to the same file simultaneously.
  • Resolve merge conflicts carefully to maintain the consistency and integrity of your repository.
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Grade: A

Here's a step-by-step guide to resolve merge conflicts in a Git repository:

Step 1: Identify the conflicting files

  • Run git status to see which files have conflicts.
  • Look for files marked as "unmerged" or "conflict".

Step 2: Open the conflicting files

  • Open each conflicting file in a text editor.
  • You'll see conflict markers <<<<<<<, =======, and >>>>>>> indicating the conflicting changes.

Step 3: Resolve the conflicts

  • Edit the file to resolve the conflict by choosing the correct version of the code.
  • Remove the conflict markers (<<<<<<<, =======, and >>>>>>>) and save the file.

Step 4: Mark the conflict as resolved

  • Run git add <file_name> to stage the resolved file.
  • Repeat steps 2-4 for each conflicting file.

Step 5: Commit the resolved merge

  • Run git commit -m "Resolved merge conflict" to commit the resolved merge.

Alternative: Use Git tools to resolve conflicts

  • Run git mergetool to open a graphical merge tool (e.g., Git Kraken, Git Tower).
  • Use the tool to resolve the conflicts and save the changes.

Verify the resolution

  • Run git log to verify that the merge conflict has been resolved.
  • Run git status to ensure there are no remaining conflicts.
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Grade: A

Here is the solution:

Step 1: Identify the Conflicting Files

  • Run git status to see the list of files with conflicts.
  • Identify the files with conflicts and navigate to the directory containing those files.

Step 2: Open the Conflicting Files

  • Open the conflicting files in a text editor or IDE.
  • Look for the conflict markers <<<<<<<, =======, and >>>>>>> which indicate the conflicting changes.

Step 3: Resolve the Conflicts

  • Manually resolve the conflicts by editing the files to combine the changes.
  • Remove the conflict markers and merge the changes.

Step 4: Stage the Resolved Files

  • Run git add <file_name> to stage the resolved files.

Step 5: Commit the Changes

  • Run git commit -m "Resolved merge conflicts" to commit the changes.

Step 6: Verify the Changes

  • Run git status to verify that the conflicts are resolved.
  • Run git log to verify the commit history.

Step 7: Push the Changes

  • Run git push to push the changes to the remote repository.

By following these steps, you should be able to resolve merge conflicts in your Git repository.

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Grade: A

To resolve merge conflicts in a Git repository, follow these steps:

  1. Identify the Conflict:

    • After attempting a merge, Git will notify you if there are conflicts.
    • Conflicts are marked in the files with <<<<<<<, =======, and >>>>>>> symbols.
  2. Open the Conflicting File:

    • Navigate to the file with the conflict and open it in your preferred text editor or IDE.
  3. Manually Resolve the Conflicts:

    • Edit the file to resolve the conflicts. You will need to choose between the changes from the two branches or combine them.
    • Remove the conflict markers (<<<<<<<, =======, >>>>>>>) and make sure the code is correct.
  4. Mark the Conflict as Resolved:

    • Save the file after resolving the conflicts.
  5. Stage the Changes:

    • Use the command git add <file> to stage the resolved file, or git add . to stage all resolved files.
  6. Complete the Merge:

    • Once all conflicts are resolved and staged, complete the merge process with the command git commit -m "Merge branch 'branch-name' into current-branch".
  7. Verify the Merge:

    • Run git log to verify the merge commit and ensure that the history is as expected.
  8. Push the Changes:

    • Push the resolved changes to the remote repository with git push origin current-branch.
  9. Additional Tools (optional):

    • Use git mergetool to launch a graphical tool to help resolve conflicts.
    • Configure your preferred merge tool by setting it with git config --global merge.tool <tool-name>.
  10. Prevent Future Conflicts (optional):

    • Communicate with your team to coordinate merges and avoid working on the same parts of the codebase simultaneously.
    • Frequently integrate changes from the main branch into your feature branch to minimize divergence.

Remember to always backup your repository or ensure that it is properly backed up before performing operations that can alter the repository's history, such as merges with potential conflicts.

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Grade: B
  • Identify the conflicting files: Git will indicate which files have conflicts that need to be resolved.

  • Understand the conflict: Examine the conflicts in each file. Conflicts typically arise when the same lines or regions of a file have been modified in different ways in the branches being merged.

  • Choose a resolution strategy: You can either accept one side of the conflict (keeping only the changes from that side), merge the changes manually (creating a blend of both sides), or decide to discard the changes entirely and revert to the pre-merge version.

  • Edit and stage the resolved files: Open the conflicting files in a text editor and make the necessary changes to resolve the conflicts.

  • Add and commit the resolved changes: Once all conflicts are resolved and the files are staged, commit the changes to finalize the merge.

  • Push the resolved changes to the remote repository: After committing the resolution, push your changes to the remote repository to share them with others.

  • Pull the latest changes from the remote repository: Finally, pull the latest changes from the remote repository to ensure your local repository is up to date.

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Grade: B

Here's a step-by-step guide to resolving merge conflicts in your Git repository:

  1. Identify the conflict: Check which files have conflicts by using the command git status.

  2. View the conflict: Open the file with the conflict in your text editor. You can also use git diff to view the differences.

  3. Understand the conflict: Conflicts occur when the same line or block of code has been changed in both branches. The typical Git conflict marker looks like this:

<<< HEAD
Your code from branch head
>>> BranchA
Code from the branch you were trying to merge
=======
  1. Resolve the conflict: Decide which version to keep or how to merge them. You can use your text editor to manually edit the file and remove the conflict markers.

  2. Save the resolved file: After resolving the conflict, save the file and commit it using git commit.

  3. Continue merging: Return to the main merge process and repeat the above steps for all conflicted files. Use git merge --continue to continue the merge.

  4. Test your changes: Ensure the conflicts are resolved and the code works as expected.

  5. Push the changes: Finally, push your resolved changes to the repository using git push.

Remember, this is a general guide, and you might need to adapt it based on your specific situation.

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Grade: B

When Git detects merge conflicts, it prompts you to resolve the conflicts. Here is how to do this:

  1. Run git status - This will show the files with conflict(s)
  2. Open these files in a text editor and locate the area that looks something like this (You’ll need to identify where the conflicts begin and end):
<<< Your changes go here
... existing-content ...
>>> Their changes go here
  1. Modify the file content between Your changes and Their changes as per your decision about which changes should be preserved, delete or merged in. Make sure to keep track of all the changes that are being made at each stage while solving the conflict.
  2. When you’ve resolved these conflicts, save the file(s) and close them.
  3. Run git add . This will stage your resolved files for commit.
  4. Commit these resolved conflicts by using: git commit -m "Your detailed message about changes after resolving conflict"
  5. At this point all merge conflicts have been addressed. You can continue to push or merge your branch with other branches as usual, if no more conflicts are present you may proceed further with normal operations such as pulling, pushing etc.

Also note that understanding the context of changes would be beneficial in deciding which change needs to go where.

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Grade: B

Here's how to resolve merge conflicts in your Git repository:

  • Identify the files with conflicts: Git will tell you which files have conflicts. You can see them in your terminal or in your Git client.
  • Open the conflicted files: Open the conflicted files in a text editor. You'll see special markers (<<<<<<<, =======, >>>>>>>) that indicate where the conflicts are.
  • Review the changes: Carefully examine the changes from both branches. You'll need to decide which changes to keep, which to discard, and how to combine them.
  • Make your changes: Edit the files to resolve the conflicts. Remove the conflict markers and make the necessary changes.
  • Stage and commit the changes: After resolving all the conflicts, stage the changed files and commit them with a message explaining the resolution.
  • Push your changes: Push your changes to the remote repository.
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Grade: B
  • Identify the conflicting files: Git will mark files with conflicts.
  • Open the conflicting file: Use any text editor.
  • Resolve the conflicts: Choose your changes or theirs, or combine both.
  • Mark the conflict as resolved: Use git add <filename>.
  • Commit the changes: Use git commit -m "Resolved merge conflict".
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Grade: B

Step 1: Identify the merge conflict

  • Open the affected file in a text editor.
  • Check the commit history and identify the changes made in each commit that caused the conflict.

Step 2: Resolve the merge conflict

  • Resolve conflicts by applying the changes from the parent commit on top of the changes from the child commit.
  • For example, if you have a branch named "feature" that was merged into "master", you can use the following commands:
git merge feature
git rm -r feature/*
git commit -m "Merged feature branch into master"

Step 3: Add and commit the changes

  • Add any resolved changes in the file.
  • Commit the changes to the repository with a descriptive message.

Step 4: Resolve conflicts in submodules

  • If you have submodules included in your Git repository, you may need to resolve conflicts in them as well.
  • You can use the git submodule update command to update the submodule and then resolve conflicts manually.

Step 5: Push the changes to a remote repository

  • Once you have resolved the conflicts, you can push the changes to a remote repository.

Tips for resolving merge conflicts:

  • Use a merge tool, such as git mergetool, to visualize and edit the changes.
  • Review the changes made in each commit to identify the root cause of the conflict.
  • Use descriptive commit messages to track the merge process.
  • Be patient, as resolving merge conflicts can take time, especially for large projects.

Additional notes:

  • You can use the git status command to see the current merge status of a file.
  • The git merge command will create a merge commit that includes the changes from both parent commits.
  • You can use the git merge -v option to get a verbose output of the merge process.
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Grade: B

To resolve merge conflicts in your Git repository, follow these steps:

  1. Identify the conflicted files by checking git status.
  2. Open the conflicted file(s) in your code editor.
  3. Locate the merge conflict markers <<<<<<<, =======, and >>>>>>>.
  4. Edit the conflicted areas in the file to resolve the conflict manually.
  5. Save the changes after resolving the conflict.
  6. Add the resolved files to the staging area using git add <file>.
  7. Commit the changes with a merge conflict message using git commit -m "Merge conflict resolved".
  8. Finally, push the changes to the repository with git push.

After following these steps, your merge conflict should be resolved in the Git repository.

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Grade: B

Try:

git mergetool

It opens a GUI that steps you through each conflict, and you get to choose how to merge. Sometimes it requires a bit of hand editing afterwards, but usually it's enough by itself. It is much better than doing the whole thing by hand certainly.


As per Josh Glover's comment:

[This command] doesn't necessarily open a GUI unless you install one. Running git mergetool for me resulted in vimdiff being used. You can install one of the following tools to use it instead: meld, opendiff, kdiff3, tkdiff, xxdiff, tortoisemerge, gvimdiff, diffuse, ecmerge, p4merge, araxis, vimdiff, emerge.


Below is a sample procedure using vimdiff to resolve merge conflicts, based on this link.

  1. Run the following commands in your terminal git config merge.tool vimdiff git config merge.conflictstyle diff3 git config mergetool.prompt false This will set vimdiff as the default merge tool.
  2. Run the following command in your terminal git mergetool
  3. You will see a vimdiff display in the following format: ╔═══════╦══════╦════════╗ ║ ║ ║ ║

║ LOCAL ║ BASE ║ REMOTE ║ ║ ║ ║ ║ ╠═══════╩══════╩════════╣ ║ ║ ║ MERGED ║ ║ ║ ╚═══════════════════════╝ These 4 views are LOCAL: this is the file from the current branch BASE: the common ancestor, how this file looked before both changes REMOTE: the file you are merging into your branch MERGED: the merge result; this is what gets saved in the merge commit and used in the future You can navigate among these views using ctrl+w. You can directly reach the MERGED view using ctrl+w followed by j. More information about vimdiff navigation is here and here. 4. You can edit the MERGED view like this: If you want to get changes from REMOTE :diffg RE If you want to get changes from BASE :diffg BA If you want to get changes from LOCAL :diffg LO 5. Save, Exit, Commit, and Clean up :wqa save and exit from vi git commit -m "message" git clean Remove extra files (e.g. *.orig). Warning: It will remove all untracked files, if you won't pass any arguments.

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Grade: C

Try:

git mergetool

It opens a GUI that steps you through each conflict, and you get to choose how to merge. Sometimes it requires a bit of hand editing afterwards, but usually it's enough by itself. It is much better than doing the whole thing by hand certainly.


As per Josh Glover's comment:

[This command] doesn't necessarily open a GUI unless you install one. Running git mergetool for me resulted in vimdiff being used. You can install one of the following tools to use it instead: meld, opendiff, kdiff3, tkdiff, xxdiff, tortoisemerge, gvimdiff, diffuse, ecmerge, p4merge, araxis, vimdiff, emerge.


Below is a sample procedure using vimdiff to resolve merge conflicts, based on this link.

  1. Run the following commands in your terminal git config merge.tool vimdiff git config merge.conflictstyle diff3 git config mergetool.prompt false This will set vimdiff as the default merge tool.
  2. Run the following command in your terminal git mergetool
  3. You will see a vimdiff display in the following format: ╔═══════╦══════╦════════╗ ║ ║ ║ ║

║ LOCAL ║ BASE ║ REMOTE ║ ║ ║ ║ ║ ╠═══════╩══════╩════════╣ ║ ║ ║ MERGED ║ ║ ║ ╚═══════════════════════╝ These 4 views are LOCAL: this is the file from the current branch BASE: the common ancestor, how this file looked before both changes REMOTE: the file you are merging into your branch MERGED: the merge result; this is what gets saved in the merge commit and used in the future You can navigate among these views using ctrl+w. You can directly reach the MERGED view using ctrl+w followed by j. More information about vimdiff navigation is here and here. 4. You can edit the MERGED view like this: If you want to get changes from REMOTE :diffg RE If you want to get changes from BASE :diffg BA If you want to get changes from LOCAL :diffg LO 5. Save, Exit, Commit, and Clean up :wqa save and exit from vi git commit -m "message" git clean Remove extra files (e.g. *.orig). Warning: It will remove all untracked files, if you won't pass any arguments.

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Grade: C

Merging conflicts can be resolved using git merge tool. There are three general methods to resolve a Git repository conflict:

  • By using the interactive mode of git mergetool
  • By using git rerere
  • Using the commandline to resolve the conflicted file.
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Grade: C

Resolving merge conflicts in Git involves identifying conflicting lines of code and choosing one to merge into your repository. To resolve merge conflicts in Git, you can use the "git add ." command to add any modified or deleted files to your staging area. Once you have added any modified or deleted files to your staging area, you can use the "git commit -m 'Commit message'" command to commit your changes to your repository. Finally, once you have committed your changes to your repository, you can use the "git merge --no-commit ." command to merge any new or modified files into your repository without automatically committing those changes to your repository.